LinkedIn member to LinkedIn Jedi status


LinkedIn is the world’s largest professional network with nearly 300 million members in over 200 countries and territories around the globe. It is seen as essential for most professionals as a networking platform, or for recruitment. The member numbers have been growing steadily for many years, as this recent diagram from eMarketer shows:

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LinkedIn basics

Members are encouraged to fill out their profile pages, and images and video assets can be added to express your accomplishments using rich media. LinkedIn help is a super guide for this. However, looking ahead, what would be the next level after member status? Jedi status of course!


LinkedIn Jedi status

Regular updates will show that you are up to date and relevant. Making comments and starting discussions in LinkedIn groups will show that you can network and guide group debate. You have to show that you can take advantage of all the measurement tools that LinkedIn makes available. Darth Vader himself has provided guidance on measuring success in LinkedIn.


Tweet: Tips to become a LinkedIn Jedi  (Infographic)  http://bit.ly/linkedin-jediTips to become a LinkedIn Jedi (Infographic)

The infographic below by Gryffin provides all the information you need to become a LinkedIn jedi.

Now you can rock LinkedIn!

Infographic LinkedIn Jedi

Infographic by Gryffin


Clive Roach


I am a social media strategist, blogger and speaker about social media marketing. This blog is a fun outlet for me to talk about new trends and applications, especially helpful if you are new to Social media. Subscribe and learn about how to use and adopt Social media for Marketing, and keep up with the latest news. I am also the Head of Social Media for Philips Lighting. I am active with strategy development, activation, governance, projects and educational training activities for all aspects of social media within Philips Lighting. I have been working in the digital marketing area since 1997, and previously held roles in engineering, design and sales. In addition to this blog, I tweet daily on two Twitter accounts, have two Facebook pages, Google+, Pinterest, So.cl, Instagram, and participate in many other social networks.


Connect with me via: Twitter | Google+ | LinkedIn | Facebook fan page | SlideShare

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Geo target tweets with HootSuite


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Geo target tweets with HootSuite

Have you ever wanted to geo target tweets in a similar way to how it is possible to geo target Facebook posts? Without the possibility to geo target tweets, companies often create additional Twitter accounts to deliver tweets in the local language of their countries. All Twitter accounts should have adequate resources and a local well managed content calendar in order for them to be effective. If the local content flow is anticipated to be low and the local resources are not available, and there is no long term budget for a local agency to help out, then using HootSuite to geo target tweets from the main company account is a viable option.

Here is a simple guide how you can do this.


“How to” video about geo targeting tweets with HootSuite.

The video highlights an important point that geo targeted tweets for a specific country will only appear to the followers of that account when they log into their Twitter accounts. Otherwise they see all the other non geo targeted tweets as normal.


HootSuite Pro, Enterprise, and free versions

They all have the geo targeted process demonstrated in the video. 


In summary

The geo targeting tweets process in HootSuite is very simple to use and is available in all the versions of HootSuite. This provides us all with a ready and simple solution to the headache of creating separate language Twitter account just to send the odd local language tweet. The advantages are numerous, but here are just a few..

  • Reduction in local language Twitter accounts created for low volumes of Tweets. These can now be geo targeted using the main Twitter accounts. Local accounts work best with a solid resource and content plan.
  • Increased Twitter social authority as your local language Tweets are not sent to all your followers, obtaining low engagement figures.
  • Less annoyed main account followers, who will be spared seeing their Twitter feeds filled with your “other language” tweets not meant for them.
  • You will be less likely to be “muted” by your main account followers while “other language” tweets are sent out via your main Twitter feed, especially during high output occasions like events etc.
  • Reduction in costs if you used promoted tweets in order to send “other language” tweets.


Clive Roach


I am a social media strategist, blogger and speaker about social media marketing. This blog is a fun outlet for me to talk about new trends and applications, especially helpful if you are new to Social media. Subscribe and learn about how to use and adopt Social media for Marketing, and keep up with the latest news. I am also the Head of Social Media for Philips Lighting. I am active with strategy development, activation, governance, projects and educational training activities for all aspects of social media within Philips Lighting. I have been working in the digital marketing area since 1997, and previously held roles in engineering, design and sales. In addition to this blog, I tweet daily on two Twitter accounts, have two Facebook pages, Google+, Pinterest, So.cl, Instagram, and participate in many other social networks.


Connect with me via: Twitter | Google+ | LinkedIn | Facebook fan page | SlideShare

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Think You’re Cut Out for Doing Social Selling?


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Social selling defined

Could social selling be the secret jewel for companies, especially B2B? Let’s start by defining social selling, as there are a few variants. Michael Brenner is my favorite writer on the subject of social selling, so I will use his definition of variant of social selling that I want to spotlight in this post: “Social selling is not just about starting the sales process with social tools like LinkedIn, Facebook or Twitter. Social selling is about sales people building a strong personal brand. It is about understanding the role of content and how content can be used to tell a powerful and emotional story. And it is about growing your social connections.”


Tweet: Social Selling can be used to tell an impactful story, growing social connections through leads to orders http://bit.ly/social-selling-jedi "Social Selling Can be used to tell an impactful story, growing social connections through leads to orders"


Social selling prerequisites

I really think that B2B companies should start investing in social media selling pilots. There are many aspects to be reviewed when getting started with social selling pilots. It is very important to consider the basics similar to any social media activity or campaign, like identifying your customer type, where and how your customers use social media, your objectives, budgets and list your expected business value outcomes. Getting started with B2B social media has many aspects. In my opinion, there are four success factors that need deep consideration in addition to the usual aspects listed above;


a) Social Media maturity.

There has to be some degree of social media maturity as regards your existing processes and the role that social media has in your digital marketing strategy, especially in the area of how social media leads are handled within your company.

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b) Having a coordinated multichannel approach.

In this era, having a coordinated multichannel go to market approach is a vital success factor for managing leads. A project lead may appear in several forms at different times so it is key to be able to identify the pieces and be able to construct a picture of how the project is progressing and this helps to identify the players, the contacts involved. Contextual intelligence! Software can really help here! I recall my previous sales life as an account manager and my card index system, cold calling and flipping through my post for updates from a lead management company. The world has moved on.. have you?

Executive buyers do still prefer email and phone when it comes to touch points for contact. However, social networks like LinkedIn make up a good share of the % of the other channels that they prefer to use so make sure you start to include social selling.

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Source: Forrester Research, Inc., Executive Buyers Prefer Email And Phone, July 26, 2013


To amplify the point, I recall an eMarketer interview with Vala Afshar, the CMO of Extreme Networks. In that interview he talked about the use of a multichannel approach. I quote Vala Afshar: “We see that we need to have a significant number of touchpoints with a client before we successfully win business. When you have multiple touchpoints, it’s important to understand the impact that you have along the buying journey” . He also said; “All of these touchpoints have a certain amount of influence, but customers are more influenced by their peers, especially in the B2B space.”


c) A cultural fit for social media.

Social selling pilots often need a top down support network. This helps fund the pilots, ensure that the result and key learning points can be spread to other segments to build on the work done. There has to be a cultural fit otherwise it could end in disappointment. The “hearts and minds” need to align. You also need to make sure that all aspects of your company social media policy are covered and also your company ethics should be aligned (assuming you have a list of company ethics ;-).

Here is an example where the culture did not match in Oracle and the social media sales expert was fired. The social media sales expert in this example was Jill Rowley. She was the best salesperson at her former company, Eloqua. She was consistently ranked as the top- or second-best performing salesperson, with clients like Wells Fargo, Square, McAfee and Salesforce. She was very skilled at using social networks like LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter.

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d) Managing risk

There might be many industry / country combinations that might not be a great fit for a social selling approach. I always say that risk assessments should always be a part of doing social media for the first time, and a risk audit might be needed for social selling pilots in some industries, or to calm fears when the culture leads to uneasy feelings. Regulated industries need some consideration. There are over 12 major regulatory bodies — including FINRA, FFIEC, FDA, FTC, SEC, and NLRB — all having something to say about how social media can be utilized safely to avoid a warning notice or much worse.

Forrester Research published a report that talked about “a growing market for social risk and compliance (SRC) solutions. These products help enable, and even optimize, social engagement while enhancing oversight and mitigating risk and compliance concerns”.


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What about YOU?

If social selling is not just about starting the sales process with social tools but more about sales people building a strong personal brand, how would this fit in your company? Is your company ready for this? Do you have the support of the C-suite? Could social selling be the next logical step in maturity plan for your social media catalysts?

Could your culture cope assuming you had mitigated any risks and had a rock solid deployment plan?

There are potentially big rewards awaiting companies that can safely navigate all these aspects, and Jill Rowley’s sales record while at Eloqua is a great example of what can be achieved when all the aspects I mentioned are aligned and Jill Rowley’s career at Oracle is a great example of what can happen when they are not.


Clive Roach


I am a social media strategist, blogger and speaker about social media marketing. This blog is a fun outlet for me to talk about new trends and applications, especially helpful if you are new to Social media. Subscribe and learn about how to use and adopt Social media for Marketing, and keep up with the latest news. I am also the Head of Social Media for Philips Lighting. I am active with strategy development, activation, governance, projects and educational training activities for all aspects of social media within Philips Lighting. I have been working in the digital marketing area since 1997, and previously held roles in engineering, design and sales. In addition to this blog, I tweet daily on two Twitter accounts, have two Facebook pages, Google+, Pinterest, So.cl, Instagram, and participate in many other social networks.


Connect with me via: Twitter | Google+ | LinkedIn | Facebook fan page | SlideShare

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8 Things Spock Would Say About Social Media Catalysts


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I love being a catalyst for new things. I have been a catalyst in the companies I have worked for with regards to Internets, Intranets in 1997, Extranets in 1999, .NET based product catalogues in 2001, and finally social media in 2009. I took all the lessons from 1997 and found that the 2009 adoption of social media was following the same path but just so much faster. Very much faster, but the same steps were there. This kept me calm as I knew fairly well that once I had achieved a certain type of proof point then I could guess what the next stage would be in the maturity path and so I could mentally prepare myself for it and the others around me.

Spock from Star Trek reminds me of the typical type of character that I have encountered on the path to social media maturity. I decided to use Spock to illustrate 8 aspects of being a social media catalyst.

Tweet: Social media catalysts need to develop proof points to get the C-suite going from skeptic, interested to fascinated http://ctt.ec/bjfGd+"Social media catalysts need to develop proof points to get the C-suite going from skeptic, interested to fascinated"


Venturing into a new world

Spock – “Insufficient facts always invite danger”

Being a new media catalyst often involves striding into the unknown in terms of what your company is used to. Catalysts have a firm belief that they have grasped the future and go boldly where no one has gone before.

I have an engineering background and I used this methodical approach to find out from as many case studies as I could before proposing a fresh new direction. I have a rich directory of these case studies now on almost any aspect of social media that you can imagine. I appreciate the concerns of Spock, and I would rather avoid danger and uncertainty too if I can possibly do so.

 

Empowered social media catalysts
Spock – “If I seem insensitive to what you’re going through, Captain, understand – it’s the way I am”

In 2010 the “Empowered” book was published, written by Josh Bernoff and Ted Schadler. It described empowered catalysts as HEROes. Chapter 9 in the book is entitled “leading and managing HEROes”. It is not as easy as it looks to manage social media catalysts when they are busy innovating and testing new programs almost every week.

Can the managers of empowered social media catalysts cope? Chapter 9 of the book suggested that there are two sides to getting HEROes to deliver actual results. “First you have to lead them, and then you have to manage them”. Wise words for managers of catalysts.



Asking lots of questions
Spock - “Has it occurred to you that there is a certain inefficiency in constantly questioning me on things you’ve already made up your mind about?”

One of the things I learnt from my years as an engineer; GET THE BRIEF RIGHT. Social media catalysts are used to experimentation to help achieve success, nothing wrong in that. Catalysts know the value of turning early pilots into success stories so that they can be used for internal promotion, knocking down barriers to other departments or business segments. So ask all the right questions so that successful social media pilots actually add business value. Many pilots often finish as successful but did not add business value because key questions that align results to business outcomes remained un-answered.


Innovation, Inspiration and Creativity

Spock - “Change is the essential process of all existence”

This was the mission statement for SXSW interactive; Innovation, Inspiration and Creativity. SXSW is one of the best events to provide social media catalysts with a fresh injection of energy. I could not attend the event this year but I did managed to attend the Iris agency event SXSW – “The best bits” in Amsterdam in May 2014 (#SXSWAMS). I heard lots of great ideas and case studies varying from content, wearables, to marketing campaigns etc.

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Spock once said “change is the essential process of all existence”. Catalysts sometimes get swamped with day to day activities and then need events like SXSW to get them up and out of the daily grind, re-acquiring the spark of creativity based on the latest ideas and trends.

 

Catalysts should be able to demonstrate business value without expensive enterprise tools.
Spock – “I’m afraid that’s illogical captain”

In the early days a social media catalyst needs to have enough room and freedom to show the impact that social media can have on the business. Essential for this is an executive sponsor and the ability to pick small pilots to create the first proof points. I spent my first two years in social media with a small amount of budget and I proved that proof points can be obtained without huge amounts of budget.

I think it was actually a good thing to start without a huge budget, as it removed the temptation to invest in one or more expensive enterprise tools to do all the work. I believe that obtaining an enterprise tool as the first action could lead to a tool based approach rather than developing a process tuned for overcoming those “hearts and minds” barriers. Catalysts need time to develop those techniques that work best for certain types of people. In the early days I created a process framework that helped people get through 90% of the thinking and planning, with the remaining 10% fueled by the use of smaller tools in specific areas. These were a mixture of 30 day free trial periods and free tools. I developed a personal program testing a new startup or free to use tool every 1-2 weeks.

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Connecting with other catalysts
Spock – “Nowhere am I so desperately needed as among a shipload of illogical humans”

I first learnt the value of connecting with like-minded souls in a digital world when I was started the first Intranet project for Thorn Lighting in 1997. I attended as many Intranet events as I could mainly to hear from the speakers but then I found that I was not among a shipload of illogical humans. I found myself talking to other Intranet catalysts fired up with the exact same assignment as I had … “Go and create our first Intranet”.

I have repeated that basic trick each time I had a new assignment to lead in the development of a new technology. Internet sites followed the Intranet, then Extranets, product catalogues and then I tackled social media in 2009. I recommend that social media catalysts surround themselves with other catalysts to keep their drive and enthusiasm up and this helped me to benchmark my progress as well. Sponsors love to know if they are ahead of the pack!

 

New roles and responsibilities in the era of emerging media
Spock - “Fascinating is a word I use for the unexpected, in this case I would think interesting would suffice.”

Brian Solis listed the fresh roles that the new media era is cultivating in his book “Engage” in the chapter “Divide and conquer”. This book has been my flight companion on many long transatlantic flights!
Here are some of the interesting role names Brian mentioned in that chapter:

 - Digital Sociologists
 - Digital Ethnographers
 - Research Librarians
 - Digital or Social Architects
 - Cartographers

I also saw a recent list of 51 hilarious social media job titles. Here are some of the ones I like the most from that list:

 - Social Media Profit Mechanic
 - Social Mercenary
 - Social Media Assassin,
Of course, the elegant… Social Media Badass

For a social media catalyst, the job title is almost irrelevant in most cases. In my opinion, social media catalysts need to develop processes and proof points to get the business C-suite like Spock going from skeptic, interested, to fascinated!



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Social media maturity
Spock - “I am endeavoring, ma’am, to construct a mnemonic circuit using stone knives and bearskins”

Social media catalysts are often active transforming their companies from the inside in the area of communication and collaboration. Forrester Research detailed 6 aspects to address that could guide companies onto the path of social media maturity. These six aspects were listed in a report called “Accelerate Your Social Maturity” from June 2012 by Christine Spivey Overby with David M. Cooperstein.

I had the pleasure of meeting Christine and I used this report to model the social media maturity of my company at that time and shared this back to Forrester in 2012. Looking back, the benchmarking was very effective indeed. Here are the 6 highlighted aspects:
 

  1. Experience
Doing social media.

  2. Resources
Companies are in need of new responsibilities and skills.

  3. Process.
This one is close to my heart. Social media catalysts are often busy creating pilots and examples of what social media could do for their business but eventually you have to tie them down to document the various processes. Do this before they courted away to startup the fire in another company.

  4. Measurement.
This topic goes much further than the usual ROI aspect.

  5. Commitment.
Long term plans supported by management

  6. Culture.
I am glad that Forrester research sees this aspect as both bottom up and top down when applied to the startup nature of social media adoption. 5 years ago I was working at both ends to start up the social media fire.



In summary

Disruptive technologies are innovations adapted so fast that they become a part of everyday life. Social media and social networking technologies are both disruptive technologies and often a catalyst is deployed to start the company adoption of them. Forget the strange job titles, or the geek appearance that some catalysts might display. They could be crucial to the adoption of a disruptive technology especially at the early stages. People that have a deep knowledge of the business, experience of the processes, and yet can perform the role of a game changer catalyst are an essential component to the adoption speed of a disruptive technology within a company.

What experience do you have with social media catalysts?

Were they successful?

Let me leave the last word to Spock and Captain Kirk…

[Spock]: “Captain, you almost make me believe in luck.”
[Captain Kirk]:  “Why, Mr. Spock, you almost make me believe in miracles.”




Clive Roach


I am a social media strategist, blogger and speaker about social media marketing. This blog is a fun outlet for me to talk about new trends and applications, especially helpful if you are new to Social media. Subscribe and learn about how to use and adopt Social media for Marketing, and keep up with the latest news. I am also the Head of Social Media for Philips Lighting. I am active with strategy development, activation, governance, projects and educational training activities for all aspects of social media within Philips Lighting. I have been working in the digital marketing area since 1997, and previously held roles in engineering, design and sales. In addition to this blog, I tweet daily on two Twitter accounts, have two Facebook pages, Google+, Pinterest, So.cl, Instagram, and participate in many other social networks.


Connect with me via: Twitter | Google+ | LinkedIn | Facebook fan page | SlideShare

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